First Look: 2021 Triumph Trident 660

Published: November 3, 2020

Smaller bikes might not be as sexy as full-bore superbikes – but they’re essential for any firm looking to expand its market. They get newer riders into the dealership, offer a cheaper way into ownership and a new middleweight engine and chassis foundation can be used in a whole new range of machines.

Aprilia’s been doing that recently with its just-launched RS660. And now, Triumph is doing the same thing with a new 660cc triple engine, in a budget, entry-level roadster, the new Trident 660. It’s aimed at the likes of Yamaha’s MT-07, Kawasaki’s Ninja 650 and the aforementioned Aprilia, with an all-new three-cylinder engine, basic roadster chassis and semi-retro looks.

Triumph Trident 660
Triumph Trident 660

New engine

The heart of the bike is the new engine, which sticks with Triumph’s triple layout, albeit in a smaller capacity than the current range. It’s got echoes of the old 675 motor, with the same 74mm bore and a shorter stroke, but the firm claims it’s an all-new lump. It’s not super-powerful, putting out around 80bhp, which puts it above the MT and Ninja, but a bit below the more sporty 100bhp Aprilia motor. Wet weight is low, just 189kg, and that should add to the general sprightliness.

The chassis is built around a steel tube frame, with decent quality Showa suspension and Nissin sliding caliper front brakes. Surprisingly, the swingarm is also steel rather than the more usual aluminium. Overall, the chassis looks like fairly steady road bike fare, and should be more than up to coping with the engine output. The electronic rider aids are a notch above the usual standards too: a colour TFT LCD dashboard, rider power modes switchable traction control and ABS. It’s also capable of Bluetooth integration, GoPro control and satnav connection.

Triumph Trident 660
Triumph Trident 660

Starting from £7,195

You’ll be able to make your own mind up about the styling, but we’re not totally sold. It has echoes of the old Street and Speed Triples, which is good, but the old-style tank badge and knee grip area looks a bit fussy to us. The price is good though – starting from £7,195, which is about £500 more than the MT-07. That’s a fair price for the extra performance and three-cylinder lump we’d say.

The new Trident won’t be the last we’ll see of this new motor we’d say. At the very least, we’d expect posher variants of the Trident with nicer chassis kit and more power (aimed at the Aprilia perhaps)…

Triumph Trident 660 specification 

ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION
Type Liquid-cooled, 12 valve, DOHC, inline 3-cylinder
Capacity 660 cc
Bore 74.0 mm
Stroke 51.1 mm
Compression 11.95:1
Maximum Power 81 PS / 80 bhp (60 kW) @ 10,250 rpm
(A2 restriction) 47 PS / 46 bhp (35 kW) @ 8,750 rpm
Maximum Torque 64 Nm (47 lbft) @ 6,250 rpm
59 Nm @ 5,250 rpm (A2 restriction)
Fuel System Multipoint sequential electronic fuel injection with electronic throttle control
Exhaust Stainless steel 3 into 1 header system with low single sided stainless steel silencer
Final Drive X-ring chain
Clutch Wet, multi-plate, slip & assist
Gearbox 6 speed
CHASSIS
Frame Tubular steel perimeter frame
Swingarm Twin-sided, fabricated steel
Front Wheel Cast aluminium, 17 x 3.5 in
Rear Wheel Cast aluminium, 17 x 5.5 in
Front Tyre 120/70R17
Rear Tyre 180/55R17
Front Suspension Showa 41mm upside down separate function forks (SFF)
Rear Suspension Showa monoshock RSU, with preload adjustment
Front Brakes Nissin two-piston sliding calipers, twin 310mm discs, ABS
Rear Brakes Nissin single-piston sliding caliper, single 255mm disc, ABS
Instruments Multi-function instruments with colour TFT screen
DIMENSIONS & WEIGHTS
Length 2020 mm (79.5 in)
Width (Handlebars) 795 mm (31.3 in)
Height Without Mirrors 1089 mm (42.9 in)
Seat Height 805 mm (31.7 in)
Wheelbase 1401 mm (55.2 in)
Rake 24.6 °
Trail 107.3 mm (4.22 in)
Wet weight 189 kg (417 lb)
Fuel Tank Capacity 14 litres (3.7 US gal)

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